Tuesday 15 October 18:30 - 19:30

Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre
UCL Wilkins Building
Gower Street
London
WC1E 6BT

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Surviving the Anthropocene: the role of groundwater

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Richard Taylor, Professor of Hydrogeology, UCL Department of Geography, delivers his Inaugural Lecture: Surviving the Anthropocene: the role of groundwater

About the lecture

Demand for freshwater is rising globally while we collectively warm the planet. These changes present immense socio-political and technical challenges to the equitable and sustainable provision of water to sustain ecosystems, food supplies, industry and human health. Further, they expose well limitations in our understanding of hydrology and current tools to assess and project water resources. I will argue that groundwater - water that flows in rocks and sediments beneath the landsurface - is often the net beneficiary of the impact of climate change on rainfall in the tropics, where by 2050 the majority of world’s population will live.

About the speaker

Professor Richard Taylor is a hydrogeologist who has for 28 years sought to better understand groundwater systems in low-income countries in tropical Africa and South Asia. A native of suburban Toronto, he currently leads two research consortia, GroFutures and AfriWatSan, working in 7 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa funded by The Royal Society, UKRI and DFID.

Image: Groundwater-fed irrigation of maize in Zambia, one of the most popular irrigated crops in sub-Saharan Africa and critical to food security across the region.

 


Inaugural Lecture Series 2019/20

This lecture is part of the 2019/20 series for UCL's Faculty of Arts & Humanities and Faculty of Social & Historical Sciences. The series provides an opportunity to recognise and celebrate the achievements of our professors who are undertaking research and scholarship of international significance, and offers an insight into the strength and vitality of the arts, humanities and social sciences at UCL. 

All our lectures are free to attend and open to all. You don't have to be a UCL staff member or student to come along.

Lectures begin at 18:30 and are typically one hour long. A drinks reception will follow, to which everyone is welcome to join.

We look forward to meeting you at one of our events.

For information on other upcoming lectures please visit: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/social-historical-sciences/news-events/inaugural-lectures




Access profile

  • There is step free access into the lecture theatre.

  • There are accessible toilet facilities within this venue.

  • There is staggered seating within the lecture theatre.

  • This venue does not have a hearing assistance system.

We aim to make our events as inclusive as possible so if you have any accessibility requirements please let us know in advance so we can try to make reasonable adjustments and ensure the appropriate measures are taken. More information about the venues accessibility can be found on the DisabledGo website.

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